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William Stanley Baker information

William Stanley Baker information

Birth date: February 28, 1928, Ferndale, United Kingdom
Death date: June 28, 1976, Málaga, Spain
Birth place: Ferndale, Rhondda Valley, Wales, UK
Height:5' 10" (1.78 m)
Profession:Actor, Producer
Spouse:Ellen Martin (m. 1950–1976)
Children:Glyn Baker, Sally Baker, Adam Baker, Martin Baker
Books:Railroad Collectibles

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Stanley Baker was unusual star material to emerge during the Fifties - when impossibly handsome and engagingly romantic leading men were almost de rigueur. Baker was forged from a rougher mould. His was good-looking, but his features were angular, taut, austere and unwelcoming. His screen persona was taciturn, even surly, and the young actor ... Wikipedia

More about William Stanley Baker:

  • Filmography
  • Awards
  • Salaries
  • Facts
  • Quotes
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Actor

Actor

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Eye Witness1950Police Sgt. Bannoch, Trial Witness
The Luck of the Graces1949TV Movie
The Hidden Room1949Policeman (uncredited)
Choir Practice1949TV MovieGeraint Llewellyn
All Over the Town1949Barnes
Underground Guerrillas1943Peter
Orzowei, il figlio della savana1977TV Mini-SeriesPaul
How Green Was My Valley1975-1976TV Mini-SeriesGwilym Morgan
Bride to Be1975Pedro de Vargas
Zorro1975/ICol. Huerta
BBC Play of the Month1974TV SeriesRobinson Crusoe / De Flores
Late Night Drama1974TV Series
Who Killed Lamb?1974TV MovieDetective Inspector Jamieson
Innocent Bystanders1972John Craig
The 21 Carat Snatch1971Inspector Silva
A Lizard in a Woman's Skin1971Inspector Corvin
Perfect Friday1970Mr. Graham
The Games1970Bill Oliver
ITV Sunday Night Theatre1970TV SeriesSam Tennant
The Last Grenade1970Maj. Harry Grigsby
Where's Jack?1969Jonathan Wild
The Girl with a Pistol1968Dr. Tom Osborne
Robbery1967Paul Clifton
Accident1967Charley
Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre1966-1967TV SeriesFrank G. Wheatley / Frank 'Gannon' Wheatley / C.C. Conover
Code Name: Heraclitus1967TV MovieFrank G. Wheatley
ITV Play of the Week1966TV SeriesJohn Ellis
Sands of the Kalahari1965Mike Bain
One of Them Is Named Brett1965Narrator
Who Has Seen the Wind?1965TV MovieJanos
Dingaka1964Tom Davis
Drama 61-671964TV SeriesChief Insp. Tom Dyke
Zulu1964Lieutenant John Chard R. E.
The Man Who Finally Died1963Joe Newman
In the French Style1963Walter Beddoes
A Prize of Arms1962Turpin
Sodom and Gomorrah1962Astaroth
Eva1962Tyvian Jones
The Guns of Navarone1961Brown
BBC Sunday-Night Play1960TV SeriesBig Tom
Concrete Jungle1960Johnny Bannion
Hell Is a City1960Inspector Harry Martineau
Jet Storm1959Capt. Bardow
Chance Meeting1959Insp. Morgan
The Angry Hills1959Conrad Heisler
Yesterday's Enemy1959Captain Langford
Armchair Theatre1958TV SeriesLuce Dorell
BBC Sunday-Night Theatre1950-1958TV SeriesCaptain Bluntschli / Richard Eynesham / Tom Friend / ...
Sea Fury1958Abel Hewson
Violent Playground1958Det. Sgt, Jack Truman
Campbell's Kingdom1957Owen Morgan
Hell Drivers1957Tom Yately
Checkpoint1956O'Donovan
Hell in Korea1956Cpl. Ryker
Child in the House1956Stephen Lorimer
Jane Eyre1956TV SeriesMr. Rochester
Alexander the Great1956Attalus
Helen of Troy1956Achilles
Richard III1955Henry, Earl of Richmond
Twist of Fate1954Louis Galt
The Good Die Young1954Mike Morgan
Hell Below Zero1954Erik Bland
Knights of the Round Table1953Modred
The Tell-Tale Heart1953/IIShortEdgar Allan Poe
Paratrooper1953Breton
The Cruel Sea1953Bennett
A Cradle of Willow1952TV MovieMartin
Whispering Smith Investigates19521st Reporter
Home to Danger1951Willie Dougan
Cloudburst1951Milkman
Captain Horatio Hornblower R.N.1951Mr. Harrison (Bosun)
Rush Job1951TV MovieSid Bonner
The Rossiter Case1951Joe
Something in the City1950Policeman (uncredited)
Lilli Marlene1950Evans
Marion1950TV MovieTom Price

Producer

Producer

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Perfect Friday1970producer - uncredited
Colosseum and Juicy Lucy1970Short producer
The Italian Job1969producer - uncredited
Where's Jack?1969producer
The Other People1968producer - uncredited
Robbery1967producer
Sands of the Kalahari1965producer
Zulu1964producer

Self

Self

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Collector's World1972TV SeriesHimself
Cinema1972TV Series documentaryHimself
Film Night1971TV SeriesHimself
Dee Time1967TV SeriesHimself
The Heart of Show Business1967TV MovieHimself - Narrator
Showman1963DocumentaryHimself (uncredited)
Secombe and Friends1959TV Mini-SeriesHimself
This Is Show Business1952TV SeriesHimself

Archive Footage

Archive Footage

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Welsh Greats2010TV Series documentaryHimself
Arena2001TV Series documentary
Un sorriso, uno schiaffo, un bacio in bocca1975
Sax Rohmer's The Castle of Fu Manchu1969Running Man

Nominated awards

Nominated awards

Nominated awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieAward shared with
1977Primetime EmmyPrimetime Emmy AwardsOutstanding Lead Actor in a Limited SeriesHow Green Was My Valley (1975)


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#Fact
1He was considered for the role of James Bond in Dr. No (1962) before his Hell Drivers (1957) co-star Sean Connery was cast.
2The part that would have been played by Baker in 1979's "Zulu Dawn" was enacted by Burt Lancaster.
3Bore a striking resemblance to his contemporary fellow actor, Australian Rod Taylor.
4Although he regretted not accepting the part of James Bond himself, Baker was a friend of and outspoken admirer of Sir Sean Connery's work in the role.
5Baker served in the Royal Army Service Corps from 1946-1948.
6In a floral tribute sent to Stanley Baker's funeral, Zulu leader Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi who had worked with him in Zulu (1964) described him as "the most decent white man I have ever met".
7Although born in Wales, Baker spent most of his formative years in England since his parents moved to London in the mid-1930s.
8Turned down many Hollywood offers during the 1950s because he wanted to keep the British film industry going. Nevertheless he was much in demand for American films. The producers of Helen of Troy (1956) were so desperate to cast him that they did not mind which part he played.
9He was offered the role of James Bond in Dr. No (1962), but turned it down because he was unwilling to commit to a three-picture contract. Baker may have regretted this decision, since a few years later he asked producer Albert R. Broccoli about the possibility of playing a villain in a Bond movie.
10He had intended to produce Zulu Dawn (1979).
11He was awarded the freedom of Ferndale, and in a ceremony which he attended in 1970, the local council placed a plaque on the house where he was born.
12His father lost a leg in an accident in the mine and was thereafter unemployed until the Second World War took men away into the services. His elder brother Freddie, a miner, died of pneumoconiosis early in 1976 after many years of debilitation and sickness.
13His breakthrough as an actor came in 1950 in Christopher Fry's anti-war play "A Sleep of Prisoners" alongside Denholm Elliott and Leonard White. The production later toured the United States.
14With the success of Concrete Jungle (1960), Baker all but displaced his polar opposite Dirk Bogarde to become Britain's most popular star. However, Zulu (1964) was his last huge success. His career was damaged by the commercial failure of Sands of the Kalahari (1965) and Robbery (1967), although the latter received favourable reviews.
15He was a close friend of Richard Burton from childhood until they fell out in 1967.
16He formed Diamond Films for the making of Zulu (1964). And later Oakhurst Productions.
17In May 1972 he was one of the co-organisers of the Great Western Bardney Pop Festival in Lincoln.
18His wife Ellen and Richard Burton believed Baker's performance in How Green Was My Valley (1975) was so good because he was playing his own father.
19At his peak he earned £120,000 for each film he made, at a time when the average house cost just £3,000. He owned a large house in London and a holiday villa in Spain, while his children attended private schools in England.
20At the time of his death he had been planning to play a rapist in a film, with his Zulu (1964) co-star Michael Caine playing a detective.
21At the beginning of his career he struggled to break into films, but a few days before his 22nd birthday he was given the role of the bosun in Captain Horatio Hornblower R.N. (1951).
22In November 2006 a Lounge dedicated to his life and work was opened by his widow, Lady Ellen Baker and his sons at Ferndale Rugby club in the village of his birth.
23At the beginning of his career he was typecast as villains until Laurence Olivier invited him to play Henry Tudor in Richard III (1955).
24He was warned not to address a CND rally prior to the release of Zulu (1964), in case his left-wing political activism hurt the film's performance in the United States.
25A dedicated socialist, he made political broadcasts for Harold Wilson's Labour Party in Wales and was active in the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND).
26Awarded a knighthood in Harold Wilson's resignation Honour's List in June 1976. At the time his knighthood was announced, Baker thought he had beaten his lung cancer following surgery in February of that year. However, although the tumour in his lung had been removed, it had spread into his chest and attached itself to his heart. Since no further surgery was possible, he had only a maximum of nine weeks to live anyway. Three weeks after the announcement of his knighthood, Baker was hospitalized in Spain with pneumonia. As he had died without making the journey to be formally knighted at Buckingham Palace, he cannot be referred to as Sir Stanley, but Queen Elizabeth II agreed that his widow Ellen Martin could use the title "Lady Baker".

#Quote
1[on his leading ladies] I did enjoy working with Ursula Andress. People like Honor Blackman are professional actresses with whom there is no bother.
2[on working with Jeanne Moreau in Eva (1962)] She was fine, but I don't subscribe to the opinion held in certain circles that she's infallible and the greatest actress to appear on the screen.
3I thought, "Yes, Rich [Richard Burton] has gone a little further than usual, but he's going to be his old self again before long. Oh, what a fool he made of us. Well, not really us. Only himself . . . I loved Rich very much, and thank God we became friends again, but I didn't like what he did to Sybil. He lost himself when he met Elizabeth Taylor.
4[Of Sybil Williams] We came from the same village. We were close friends. When I heard that Rich [Richard Burton] and Sybil had got together, I thought, "The lucky bastard". She was the best thing that ever happened to him.
5Mine is a hell of a face, but ;it keeps me in work because there aren't many like it.
6[on Elia Kazan] He chose the actors that he wanted, made the film he wanted to make, and he made it the way he wanted to make it with absolutely no contribution or interference from the major distributors at that time. That was a major step forward at that time in the film industry. He was a pioneer and he made it possible for other people.
7[on Anthony Quinn] I personally like big acting, like that of Anthony Quinn. He is the quintessence, if you'll pardon the pun, of the actor who is able to control big emotion for the screen. A lot of lightweight performances on the screen don't work for me because I can't see anything behind them. With Quinn, it's difficult not to see everything behind it.
8I was a complete dud at school. I hated school. I got into awful trouble. Before I met Welsh school teacher Glyn Morris every teacher thought of me as a good-for-nothing.
9If it hadn't been for one man, just one man who luckily took me up, I would have always hated school and I would probably have ended up as one of the criminals I've played too many times on the screen.
10I made up my mind years ago, that the best parts in films always went to the villain. I was determined to corner the bad man's market.
11I'm a dedicated Socialist first of all, I suppose, because ... I saw the things that happened to ... my family, and to the people around me. That sort of existence must stay in your mind.
12It's impossible to direct yourself in a movie.

#Trademark
1Often played tough working class characters

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